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Post-Soviet Neo-Eurasianism, the Putin System, and the Contemporary European Extreme Right

Post-Soviet Neo-Eurasianism, the Putin System, and the Contemporary European Extreme Right

by Andreas Umland, the Institute for Euro-Atlantic Cooperation in Kyiv

Cas Mudde recently observed that “populist radical right parties are the most studied party family in political science.”2 While the interest of social researchers for ultra-nationalist political groups and networks—not only parties—in the West has indeed risen markedly during the last quarter of century, this cannot be said, to the same degree, about the East-Central European and especially post-Soviet far right. There exists, to be sure, a certain body of scholarly literature on these objects now too.3 Yet many details and circumstances of the emergence and development of relevant extremely right-wing groupings in such countries as Hungary, Slovakia, Poland, and Romania, as well as especially Serbia and Ukraine, still remain to be explored, contextualized, and interpreted.4 This is in spite of the fact that some of these parties were temporarily included in their countries’ coalition governments.5

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Perspectives on Politics  /  Volume 15, Issue 2  /  June 2017, pp. 465-476